Wednesday, 29 September 2010

God's Eye Stitch

Here is a rather unusual stitch called God's Eye Stitch. God's Eye's or Ojo de Dios are commonly made by the Huichole Indians of Mexico and remind us of God's watchful eye. It is a weaving technique which uses two sticks formed into a cross and then woven with colourful threads and wools, you can find lots of tutorials on Google for them. They are great fun to make with children to learn simple weaving techniques. The God's Eye Stitch is worked in a similar way with a cross of straight stitches woven with a spiral of backstitches. The stitch can be worked on plain or evenweave fabrics and can be used as an isolated stitch or scattered as a heavy filling for a shape.

Ok, to work a God's Eye Stitch you need to first form your cross. Bring your needle up at 1, down at 2, up at 3 and down at 4. 



Begin weaving the four arms of the cross with a spiral of backstitches. Bring your needle up at 1 to the left of the top of the cross you just made. Insert the needle back over the top of the vertical stitch and under the horizontal stitch as shown below. Do not pierce the fabric. Continue working backstitches over the four arms of the cross until the top part is covered. Try working this stitch in wool threads to give a really textured effect.





4 comments:

  1. Hi Sarah
    Just leaving you a note to say thanks for your posts. I read every one and have practiced some. So...Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge.
    Carol

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  2. That's an interesting stitch. I looked at it and imagined it as the centre of a flower, either in stumpwork, or flat embroidery with a slightly 3D effect. Anne

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  3. Thanks for this post. I have a Halloween pattern I want to stitch, and they use this stitch as the eyes. Your instructions are very clear and concise.

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  4. Thanks guys for your comments glad you enjoyed the tutorial!

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Cheers!
Sarah